Last edited by Meztikora
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska found in the catalog.

Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska

Ronald L. Olson

Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska

by Ronald L. Olson

  • 38 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in [Berkeley .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Alaska.
    • Subjects:
    • Tlingit Indians -- Social life and customs.,
    • Social structure -- Alaska.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 123.

      Statementby R. L. Olson.
      SeriesUniversity of California publications. Anthropological records ;, v. 26, Anthropological records ;, v. 26
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE51 .A58 vol. 26
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 123 p.
      Number of Pages123
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5597140M
      LC Control Number68002894

      The Tlingit marriages were arranged and the man went to live in the woman's house. A man was supposed to get married to a woman who comes from his father's clan but both should not be related. This means that children and their paternal grandfather shared a clan. Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska: Authors: Olson, Ronald L. Date: Series: University of California Anthropological Records: Volume: University of California Anthropological Records Pages: i-x, Subjects: Tlingit Indians--Social life and customs: Format: Article Online: ucarpdf.

      See L. Jones, A Study of the Tlingets of Alaska (, repr. ); T. M. Durlach, The Relationship Systems of the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian (, repr. ); R. L. Olsen, Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska (); F. De Laguna, Under Mount Saint Elias (). Olson R. Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska: University of California Press. Paige A, Churchill S, Ratner N, Turek M, Coiley-Kenner P. Local Knowledge, Harvest Patterns, and Community Uses of Salmon in Wrangell, Alaska. Swanton JR.

      Ronald Olson, Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska, A nthropological Records 26 (Berkeley, CA: Universit y of California Press, ); Harvey Feit, “North. In Tlingit, Yeil is Raven and Ch'aak is Eagle (Wolf is sometimes used interchangeably with Eagle). Each clan is made up of clan houses. The Haida people and Tlingit people have always lived on these sacred and wondrous lands and waters of Southeast Alaska as the original occupants and guardians.


Share this book
You might also like
Learning from Japan (Contemporary Japan)

Learning from Japan (Contemporary Japan)

W.B. Yeats

W.B. Yeats

Selection criteria and laboratory evaluation of oil spill sorbents.

Selection criteria and laboratory evaluation of oil spill sorbents.

Uganda since independence

Uganda since independence

Insulin receptor substrate signaling in the central nervous system

Insulin receptor substrate signaling in the central nervous system

String trio.

String trio.

Engineering solutions to industrial corrosion problems

Engineering solutions to industrial corrosion problems

Manual of emergency medicine

Manual of emergency medicine

Legal care for your software

Legal care for your software

The Beginnings of a New National Historic Preservation Program, 1957 to 1969

The Beginnings of a New National Historic Preservation Program, 1957 to 1969

A remonstrance from his Excellency Sir Tho. Fairfax and the army under his command

A remonstrance from his Excellency Sir Tho. Fairfax and the army under his command

Guide [and] map of Montreal.

Guide [and] map of Montreal.

Provisional annotated chronological list of witch-finding movements in Malawi, 1850-1980

Provisional annotated chronological list of witch-finding movements in Malawi, 1850-1980

Hampton Court illustrated

Hampton Court illustrated

Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska by Ronald L. Olson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska, (University of California publications. Anthropological records) Unknown Binding – January 1, by Ronald L Olson (Author)Author: Ronald L Olson. Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska (University of California publications.

Anthropological records) [Olson, Ronald L] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska (University of.

ETHNOLOGY: Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska. OlsonAuthor: Peter Stone. Title: Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska. Published By: Original publisher Berkeley: University of California Press.

x, p. By line: Author's name as appearing in the actual publication by R. Olsen. HRAF Publication Information: New Haven, Conn.: Human Relations Area Files, Computer File.

Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska / by R. Olson | National Library of Australia Due to the need to contain the spread of coronavirus (COVID) the Library building and reading rooms are closed to visitors until further notice. In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F.

Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians. Book Description: In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F.

Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians.

The Tlingit Indians maintained a strict social structure. There were three social classes, the anyaddi, the highest class, followed by the kanackideh, and lastly, the nitkakaku. Visiting tribes and other guests were controlled by local clans. WIthin the Tlingit tribe, there were many clans.

The Alaska Native Brotherhood did much to fight these prejudices and elevate the social status of the Tlingit and Haida people as American citizens.

Today, although Tlingit people are much more accepted, their fight for survival continues. The Athabascans of Alaska traditionally lived along five Alaskan rivers: the Yukon, the Tanana, the Susitna, the Kuskokwim, and the Copper River.

Athabascan Social Structure The Athabascans have a matrilineal system in which children belong to the mother’s. English, Book edition: Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska / by R. Olson. Olson, Ronald LeRoy, Buy Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska by Ronald LeRoy Olson (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Ronald LeRoy Olson. Buy Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska (University of California publications.

Anthropological records) Berkeley, University of California Press, by Ronald L Olson (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Ronald L Olson.

In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F. Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians.

Place signifies not only a specific geographical location but also reveals the ways in which individuals and social groups define notion of place consists of three dimensions - space.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Olson, Ronald L. (Ronald Leroy), Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska. Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska. [Ronald L Olson] Home.

WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library.

Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or Search WorldCat. Find items in libraries near you. Finally, the Tlingit, a fishing and hunting tribe in what is today Alaska, had a matrilineal social structure. Their society centered on tight knit communities or Kwans, which contained several wood houses.

The Tlingit also placed a great deal of importance on the family and family identity. Social structure is the way people view their roles in society and their relationships with others. It includes such concepts as "family", "status", and division of labor between males and females.

In Tlingit culture, the social structure in its entirety was most completely operative in the winter village. Author of The Quinault Indians, Social structure and social life of the Tlingit in Alaska, Adze, canoe, and house types of the Northwest coast, Chumash prehistory, Clan and moiety in native America, The Social organization of the Haisla of British Columbia, Notes on the Bella Bella Kwakiutl, Social life of the Owikeno Kwakiutl.

Tlingit social structure consisted of a multiple-leveled hierarchy based upon both the general number and distribution of the members, yet all are (for the most part) equally important in determining one’s place in Tlingit society (Figure II).

R Olson "Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska" 26 Anthropological Records Berkeley. Piddcocke S Piddcocke "The Potlatch System of the Southern Kwakiutl: A New Perspecitive" 21(3) South-western Journal of Anthropology Ray F Ray "Rejoinder" 58 American Anthropologist Rohner The unpublished manuscript: "History of Tlingit Tribes and Clans, by George Emmons (N.D.) The unpublished list of "Tlingit Tribe, Clan, and House Group Names," by Jeff Leer () Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit Alaskan, by Ronald Olson ().Raven Yakutat Tlingits at a Sitka Potlatch, Dec.

9th, The word "potlatch" means "to give" from the Chinook jargin on the Columbian River. For many Northwest Coast Native peoples, includng the Tlingit people, potlatches (ku.éex’) were an immensely important occasion featuring speeches, dancing, singing, feasting, and the lavish distribution of property.